Organizing Journal Articles

create-865017_960_720One of the biggest challenges I’ve had on my PhD journey is organizing. Organizing journal articles, organizing time, organizing the contents of the dissertation, and organizing concurrent projects.

I’m not the first, and I certainly won’t be the last, PhD student to have these problems. Over the last couple of years I’ve read copious blogs posts and talked to other PhD students about how they organize everything to do with school, and, not surprisingly, everyone has different methods or organizational procedures.

Raul Pacheco-Vega provides excellent advice about organizing at the academic level. I totally understand why he is an organizational guru. Like me, he values his time and strives to work effectively and efficiently as possible.

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Fantastic Resource of the Week

In one of my first PhD classes we briefly talked about the impact factor that some journals have. Commonly known as IF, the impact factor is calculated based on the average number of journal articles that have been cited in other scholarly work in the last several years. After a quick Google search, I discovered that the IF is calculated by one of the world’s largest publishers: Thomson Reuters.

I had also heard that a letter (and I couldn’t remember which of the 26 it is) is also used as some sort of impact measurement. It was my lucky day when, as I was reading a recent article in the British Journal of Educational Technology, I noticed the IF and the H Index. I’d found my missing letter

With that small piece of information in hand I soon discovered SJR SCIImago Journal and Country Rank (http://www.scimagojr.com/index.php). I felt like a kid in a sandbox as I began playing with the various search functions.

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